Making a Break For It.

Model Car Building

This is the scratch-built competition brake master cylinder assembly I just completed for my 1/8 scale 1962 Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe model car. Next, I’ll add a little black-washing for grime, then attach break lines. Once the assembly is glued into place, I’ll have to fish the lines through the car and attach them to clips with fittings where the hard lines connect to soft lines that go to the wheels.

Back-tracking Again.

Model Car Building

This is what you have to do when you realize too late that the stock kit had a very unauthentic frame assembly and you have to scratch-build the missing components after you already have the engine and suspension in place. I did experiment with building and the subframe before mounting the engine (like a real car!), but the engine wouldn’t clear the firewall.

For those of you considering modifying the Revell or Monogram 1/8 scale Jaguar, talk to me! For the most part, it’s a pretty good kit, but many of the parts and subassemblies are toylike in design. I’m really becoming a proponent of building a kit twice, especially if you’re planning mods–once without painting to familiarize yourself with the stock models idiosyncrasies so that you can plan your build, and then the actual painted build. For this build, I had to really go against the order of assembly laid out in the instructions.

One other recommendation: Don’t be like me, and make it up as you go! Settle on the car you want to model and the level of detail you want include, then stick to the plan. I’ve always been impatient and too in a hurry to dive into a project, and I pay for it with a lot of rework.

It’s the Details.

Model Car Building

Here’s a side-by-side comparison of my 1/8 scale Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe model interior and the actual car which is in a museum in Venice, Florida. Still a few things to add. Not happy with the steering wheel. I worked with the kit wheel by filling in the holes in the spokes, but I keep getting seams, and it cracked, and the spokes are too big. I’m debating about scratch building a new one.

Engine-ering.

Model Car Building

Here is the progress on the Lucas Fuel Injection Meter installation on the engine of my 1/8 scale 1963 Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe. Here are a couple reference photos to show you what I was aiming at.