Wrestling With Paint.

Model Car Building, What's new with me

Application of the white color coat has been a challenge. The Dupli-Color paint doesn’t seem to like the primer I used. I really couldn’t get a smooth coat and I got some crazing in some places. So, I wet sanded the problem spots and forged on to get pretty decent coats. You’ll notice that I rigged my small paint booth to better accommodate the 1:8 scale size.

Next comes a clear top coat, which is going to be Futura floor finish.

Progress.

Model Car Building, What's new with me

It’s been awhile since my last update on my 1/8 scale 1962 Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe model build, so here’s some photos of what I’ve been working on. I’m almost done with the engine compartment, but I have switched to body work, which is very tricky. The stock kit seems to be designed for beginners who are not going to paint it. If, like me, you’re going to paint the body inside and out, you can’t assemble the monocoque following the instructions. I’ve had to plan out the sub-assemblies and how I’m going to join them in the end. I’m painting each of the seven body pieces separately. Thankfully, the real car has body seams showing.

I’m using Rustoleum 2x Ultra Cover Flat Gray Primer for the first time and I’m really pleased with how easy it goes on. The final coat will be Dupli-Color Super White II.

The real car has a British Racing Green interior color. I’m guessing the original Jaguar was that color inside and out before the Briggs & Cunningham livery was applied. I custom mixed my own acrylic craft paint to get close to the right green. It’s applied with an airbrush.

 

Under the Bonnet.

Model Car Building

I’m adding all the sheet metal work under the bonnet that is not in the stock kit. This will include custom fabrications for the race car, such as duct work for brake cooling and interior ventilation.

 

Details, Details.

Model Car Building

I’ve made a correction to the break system: I had left off the dedicated rear master cylinder (I couldn’t see it in the reference photos I had), so I had to scratch-build another one and add it the assembly. Accelerator linkage has also been added, along with what I think is a fuel filter and a break fluid overflow canister. On the other side of the engine compartment I’ve installed the windshield wiper fluid reservoir and pump.

Making a Break For It.

Model Car Building

This is the scratch-built competition brake master cylinder assembly I just completed for my 1/8 scale 1962 Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe model car. Next, I’ll add a little black-washing for grime, then attach break lines. Once the assembly is glued into place, I’ll have to fish the lines through the car and attach them to clips with fittings where the hard lines connect to soft lines that go to the wheels.

Back-tracking Again.

Model Car Building

This is what you have to do when you realize too late that the stock kit had a very unauthentic frame assembly and you have to scratch-build the missing components after you already have the engine and suspension in place. I did experiment with building and the subframe before mounting the engine (like a real car!), but the engine wouldn’t clear the firewall.

For those of you considering modifying the Revell or Monogram 1/8 scale Jaguar, talk to me! For the most part, it’s a pretty good kit, but many of the parts and subassemblies are toylike in design. I’m really becoming a proponent of building a kit twice, especially if you’re planning mods–once without painting to familiarize yourself with the stock models idiosyncrasies so that you can plan your build, and then the actual painted build. For this build, I had to really go against the order of assembly laid out in the instructions.

One other recommendation: Don’t be like me, and make it up as you go! Settle on the car you want to model and the level of detail you want include, then stick to the plan. I’ve always been impatient and too in a hurry to dive into a project, and I pay for it with a lot of rework.

It’s the Details.

Model Car Building

Here’s a side-by-side comparison of my 1/8 scale Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe model interior and the actual car which is in a museum in Venice, Florida. Still a few things to add. Not happy with the steering wheel. I worked with the kit wheel by filling in the holes in the spokes, but I keep getting seams, and it cracked, and the spokes are too big. I’m debating about scratch building a new one.

Engine-ering.

Model Car Building

Here is the progress on the Lucas Fuel Injection Meter installation on the engine of my 1/8 scale 1963 Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe. Here are a couple reference photos to show you what I was aiming at.

Nuts and Bolts

Model Car Building

Here’s an update of my 1/12 scale Monogram 57 Belair Gasser build. I’ve primed the undercarriage with red oxide Plastikote, and thin top coated with semi-gloss black paint. I then lightly rubbed edges with fine steel wool to age. Faux bolt heads and nuts are sliced styrene hex rod. When glue is cured I’ll finish sanding  those and prime and paint them.

Bench Seats are All Right With Me.

Model Car Building

This took some doing. My stock Monogram 1/12 scale 57 Chevy plastic model kit came with the option of solid molded bench or bucket seats. I was going to go with the buckets, but thought, What about modifying the bench seat to actually operate like the real car? Remember having to fold the seat forward to get into the back seat of a two-door? Well, after many hours of cutting, gluing, and trying different ways to hinge the seat backs so the outer edge of the seat back folds farther forward than the inner edge, I finally made it work, however imperfectly.

The hinge arms are nylon model airplane micro pivot hinges and flattened brass tubing. the ribbed nylon hinge plugs into piece of styrene tubing glued to the seat frame. The inner part of the seat backs pivot on a small bolt and nut thread loosely through a styrene bracket glued to the underside of the bench seat. Everything can be disassembled for putty and painting.