Wrestling With Paint.

Application of the white color coat has been a challenge. The Dupli-Color paint doesn’t seem to like the primer I used. I really couldn’t get a smooth coat and I got some crazing in some places. So, I wet sanded the problem spots and forged on to get pretty decent coats. You’ll notice that I rigged my small paint booth to better accommodate the 1:8 scale size.

Next comes a clear top coat, which is going to be Futura floor finish.

Progress.

It’s been awhile since my last update on my 1/8 scale 1962 Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe model build, so here’s some photos of what I’ve been working on. I’m almost done with the engine compartment, but I have switched to body work, which is very tricky. The stock kit seems to be designed for beginners who are not going to paint it. If, like me, you’re going to paint the body inside and out, you can’t assemble the monocoque following the instructions. I’ve had to plan out the sub-assemblies and how I’m going to join them in the end. I’m painting each of the seven body pieces separately. Thankfully, the real car has body seams showing.

I’m using Rustoleum 2x Ultra Cover Flat Gray Primer for the first time and I’m really pleased with how easy it goes on. The final coat will be Dupli-Color Super White II.

The real car has a British Racing Green interior color. I’m guessing the original Jaguar was that color inside and out before the Briggs & Cunningham livery was applied. I custom mixed my own acrylic craft paint to get close to the right green. It’s applied with an airbrush.

 

A Big Fan.

The stock 1:8 scale Revell Jaguar XKE kit does not include the electric fan that cools the radiator. As I said in a previous post, this is for the most part a great kit, but is almost toy-like in a great many details. So, I scratch-built one. I didn’t get the scale right, but what’s new. I couldn’t find any reference photos of a Briggs & Cunningham Jag that showed the fan, so I referred to street car photos.

Details, Details.

I’ve made a correction to the break system: I had left off the dedicated rear master cylinder (I couldn’t see it in the reference photos I had), so I had to scratch-build another one and add it the assembly. Accelerator linkage has also been added, along with what I think is a fuel filter and a break fluid overflow canister. On the other side of the engine compartment I’ve installed the windshield wiper fluid reservoir and pump.

Making a Break For It.

This is the scratch-built competition brake master cylinder assembly I just completed for my 1/8 scale 1962 Briggs & Cunningham Jaguar E-Type Le Mans Racing Coupe model car. Next, I’ll add a little black-washing for grime, then attach break lines. Once the assembly is glued into place, I’ll have to fish the lines through the car and attach them to clips with fittings where the hard lines connect to soft lines that go to the wheels.